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RECOVERY tips

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Mobility tip of the Week

Stand up paddleboarding is a fantastic way to get on the water, exercise and enjoy the glide but it can be hard on the body. Especially the harder you push your boards hull speed. Stand up paddleboards are not the fastest vessel on the water. At over 26″ wide for most boards, there is a lot of drag and for the people trying to get the most speed possible out of your board, it takes its toll on the body. We have experienced numerous nagging injuries from our years of racing, especially in the early years, as boards were really slow!

As crossfitters we understand the benefits of mobility and we have been huge fans of Kelly Starrett since starting crossfit in 2008. I am very happy to see him in this article with SUP the mag. Kelly is a paddler so he really understands what we can put our body through while searching for more speed on our SUP. Kelly is straightforward and tells it like it is and the bottom line is if you want to go faster you need to be more efficient and to be more efficient you need to understand the techniques of the stroke but also be physically mobile enough to practice those understandings. Follow Kelly’s blog, http://www.mobilitywod.com/ for great tips on mobility!

Check out this great video Kelly put out…..

http://www.mobilitywod.com/2013/09/community-mwod-video-stand-up-paddling/

Today’s community episode is a quick glimpse of how we apply the principles of our system to even esoteric-fringe sports like stand-up paddling. The movement/physiologic principles of the body are applicable to any position or sport. Why do we hammer foot position and not collapsing your ankles on silly exercises like box jumps and double-unders? Because moving well is moving well. What’s the point of learning how to screw your feet into the ground when you squat if you don’t also do it in actual sports? That flexed upper back that is wrecking your over-head shoulder positioning? Well, it’s ruining your paddling too. That’s one of the reasons we do all of this complicated exercising. It’s up to us to connect the dots. Oh, remember when Greg Glassman said we should go out and learn new sports all the time? Well, one of the reasons is because that a new sport gives you a chance to apply the principles of human movement to a new platform. Around our gym, one of the ways we define the “best athlete” is the kid that can pick up the new skill the fastest. Take what you know, map it onto a new sport, and don’t forget what you already know and are good at.

Kstar

Are you overtrained?

Here is a great article about recognizing the signs of overtraining.

http://breakingmuscle.com/strength-conditioning/coaching-tip-top-signs-of-overtraining

How do you know when you are doing too much?

  • Persistent fatigue – are you more tired than you should be?
  • Elevated resting heart rate – this may be especially evident first thing in the morning.
  • Frequent illness – does it seem like you catch every cold and virus going around?
  • Decreased strength and performance – are you getting weaker and slower despite your workouts?
  • Insomnia – are you tired all day, but have difficulty sleeping at night?
  • Chronic muscle soreness – are you muscles always sore and tender?
  • High cortisol levels – you may notice it’s hard to get rid of the weight around your mid-section.
  • Depression – loss of motivation and enthusiasm.

Super Food recipes

This is a great article from http://www.motherearthliving.com on super foods!

Let’s be honest: There’s no such thing as “The Perfect Food.” Natural foods—of superfood status or not—function as team players, each contributing a unique and complementary set of nutritional attributes (a key to why pursuing health through isolated synthetic vitamins is not particularly effective). Understandably, the mantra behind superfood cuisine is to promote a top-quality variety of exciting edibles that together offer prime nutritional synergy.

4 Superfood Recipes

• Superfruit Salad recipe
• Spring Salad with Ginger Dressing recipe
• Quinoa with Sun-Dried Tomatoes and Pesto Sauce recipe
• Black-Eyed Pea and Kale Stew recipe

Of course, looking at the core definition of a superfood alone, it’s easy to see that a great number of vegetables, fruits, seeds and other plant-based foods function in ways that would qualify them as worthy of wearing the “nutrient-dense” cape. Nonetheless, some superfoods are so profoundly packed with beneficial qualities, they deserve a closer look. It’s not that they offer different nutrition than everyday plant-based whole foods per se; they just offer it in a dramatically higher concentration. Some of these foods are so nutrient-dense, they require as little as a spoonful to catapult an entire recipe into superfood status.

The following cherry-picked “specialty superfoods” are chosen for their efficient contribution to living a healthy lifestyle. Though I’m finding these ingredients available in more and more local retail outlets thanks to an increase in superfood popularity, depending on where you live, you may need to do a little hunting to find some of them. Most, however, can be found in your neighborhood health-food store, and if they don’t carry an ingredient, put in a request to the manager to bring in this new item, or place a special order (you’ll help make these foods a staple grocery item for everyone).

Of course, the earth abounds with astoundingly healthy edibles, some of which are just being discovered. But for kitchen purposes, the foods listed here have the golden combination of being readily available, as well as useful from a culinary (aka deliciousness) standpoint.

Read more: http://www.motherearthliving.com/food-and-recipes/food-for-health/4-superfood-recipes-zmfz13mjzmel.aspx?newsletter=1&utm_content=05.28.13+HW&utm_campaign=HW&utm_source=iPost&utm_medium=email#ixzz2UbRcjkFb

You are what you eat…….

Its necessary to understand that if you are going to put your body through any type of physical activity, you better eat right to get the most out of that physical activity. Its like putting gas into your car, the better the gas the better the car runs.

Below is a great article we found with strategies to eat better.

Strategies to Eat Better – The Athlete’s Kitchen

The Athlete’s Kitchen – brought to you by www.athletesadvisor.com
Copyright: Nancy Clark, MS RD CSSD January 2008

Strategies to Eat Better

More often than not, athletes ask me “What is a well balanced diet? What should I be eating to help me perform at my best?” They feel overwhelmed by the seemingly endless list of nutrition don’ts. Don’t eat white sugar, white bread, processed foods, fast foods, french fries, soda, salt, trans fats, butter, eggs, red meat… You’ve heard it all, I’m sure.
If you want to eat better but don’t know where to start, here’s a nutrition strategy that can help you fuel your body with a well balanced sports diet. The suggestions guide you towards an eating style that’s simple and practical, yet can effectively help you eat well to perform well, despite today’s bewildering food environment.

• Eat at least three kinds of nutrient-dense food at each meal. Don’t eat just one food per meal, such as a bagel for breakfast. Add two more foods: peanut butter and lowfat milk. Don’t choose just a salad for lunch. Add grilled chicken and a crusty whole grain roll. For dinner, enjoy pasta with tomato sauce and ground turkey. Two-thirds of the meal should be whole grains, vegetables, and fruits, and one-third lowfat meats, dairy, beans or other protein-rich foods.
Too many athletes eat a repetitive menu with the same 10 to 15 foods each week. Repetitive eating keeps life simple, minimizes decisions, and simplifies shopping, but it can result in an inadequate diet and chronic fatigue. The more different foods you eat, the more different types of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients you consume. A good target is 35 different foods per week. Start counting!

• Eat “closer to the earth” by choosing more foods in their natural state. For instance, choose oranges rather than orange juice; orange juice rather than sports drink; whole-wheat bread rather than white bread; baked potatoes rather than french fries. Foods in their natural (or lightly processed) state offer more nutritional value and less sodium, trans fat, and other health-eroding ingredients. You’ll find these foods along the perimeter of the grocery store: fresh produce, lean meats, lowfat dairy, whole grain breads. If possible, choose locally grown foods that support your local farmer and require less fuel for transportation to the market.

• Fuel your body on a regular schedule, eating even-sized meals every four hours. For example, a reducing diet (non-dieters need another 100-200 calories per meal) might be:
Breakfast (7-8:00 am): 500 calories (cereal + milk + banana)
Lunch (11-noon): 500 calories (sandwich + milk)
Lunch #2 (3-4:00): 400-500 calories (yogurt +granola+nuts)
Dinner (7-8:00 pm): 500-600 cals (chicken +potato + greens)
This differs from the standard pattern of skimpy 200 to 300 calorie breakfasts and lunches that get followed by too many calories of sugary snacks and super-sized dinners.
Depending on your body size, each meal should be the equivalent of two to three pieces of pizza; that’s about 500 to 750 calories (or 2,000 to 3,000 calories per day). Think about having four “food buckets” that you fill with 500 to 750 calories from at least kinds of foods every four hours. Even if you want to lose weight, you can (and should) target 500 calories at breakfast, lunch #1 and lunch #2. Those meals will ruin your evening appetite, so you’ll be able to “diet” at dinner by eating smaller portions. (Note: Most active people can lose weight on 2,000 cals, believe it or not!)
Whatever you do, try to stop eating in a “crescendo” (with meals getting progressively bigger as the day evolves). Your better bet is to eat on a time-line and consume 3/4 of your calories in the active part of your day; eat less at the end of the day. One runner took this advice and started eating his dinner foods for lunch, a sandwich for lunch #2 (instead of snacking on cookies) and then had soup and a bagel for dinner. He enjoyed far more energy during the day, was able to train harder in the afternoon, and significantly improved his race times.

• Honor hunger. Eat when you are hungry, and then stop eating when you feel content. Hunger is simply a request for fuel; your body is telling you it burned off what you gave it and needs a refill. To disregard hunger is abusive. Just as you would not withhold food from a hungry infant, you should not withhold food from your hungry body. If you do, you will start to crave sweets (a physiological response to calorie deprivation) and end up eating “junk”.
While counting calories is one way to educate yourself how to fill each 500-calorie “bucket” (for calorie information, use food labels, http://www.fitday.com, and http://www.calorieking.com/foods), you can more simply pay attention to your body’s signals. Keep checking in with yourself, “Is my body content? Or, does my body need this fuel?” If confronted with large portions that would leave you feeling stuffed, consider letting the excess food go to waste, not to “waist.”

• Think moderation. Rather than categorize a food as being good or bad for your health, think about moderation, and aim for a diet that offers 85 to 90 percent quality foods and 10 to 15 percent foods with fewer nutritional merits. Enjoy a foundation of healthful foods, but don’t deprive yourself of enjoyable foods. This way, even soda pop and chips, if desired, can fit into a nourishing food plan. You just need to balance the “junk” with healthier choices throughout the rest of the day. That is, you can compensate for an occasional greasy sausage and biscuit breakfast by selecting a low-fat turkey sandwich lunch and a grilled fish dinner.

• Take mealtimes seriously. If you can find the time to train hard, you can also find the time to fuel right. In fact, competitive athletes who don’t show up for meals might as well not show up for training. You’ll lose your edge with hit or miss fueling, but you’ll always win with good nutrition!

Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD (Board Certified Specialist in Sports
Dietetics) counsels both casual and competitive athletes in her practice at Healthworks, the premier fitness center in Chestnut Hill MA (617-383-6100). Her Sports Nutrition Guidebook, Food Guide for Marathoners, and Cyclist’s Food Guide are available via www.nancyclarkrd.com . See also sportsnutritionworkshop.com.

Daily workout, December 3rd. – Recovery

Today is a recovery day so get out but keep the heart rate low, focus on technique and have fun with your work out. Also try and get some yoga or some kind of stretching in today. Check out Mobility WOD for great ideas on specific area pains and gains.

Recover:

45min @ 50%, row, sup, oc, run, bike, swim…….

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Showing @kayalampa what the #oc1 is all about! @puakeadesigns Hey whatcha looking at? Fun times racing with the crew @tahoenalu #jaxiboy being the best race wingman! Dear wind gods please please please send some more wind to #laketahoe so I can play on my @puakeadesigns #oc1 #kahekaipro #thankyou @hiballenergy @officialmauijim @qbpaddles @tahoewatermanslanding @tahoewaterman @3fu3l @stompsessions @gopro Fun day @tahoenalu with #teamtahoewaterman @tahoewatermanslanding @trent.carter @sagequinn_ @delila.quinn @coophoneywell @zenin.quinn_ @jimmytqb @qbpaddles @puakeadesigns @hiballenergy @officialmauijim @anikdemerswild @ryan.funk Love when this guy comes into town and jumps right into helping out customers @tahoewatermanslanding  @jimmytqb @qbpaddles #qbpaddles @lizzietqb @anikdemerswild #paddletahoe #watermanslandingtahoe It was a beautiful day looking through my @officialmauijim sunnies #mauijim #mauijimfilter Hammered out some miles and caught some great bumps on these machines @puakeadesigns always with my trusty @qbpaddles in hand! @anikdemerswild coaching the women up #womenonwaters @ehiku #tahoewaterman #watermanslandingtahoe #paddletahoe @surftechusa #weliveforthis @qbpaddles #qbpaddles @officialmauijim #nofilter @hiballenergy #hiballenergy